As you have noticed, you need Visual Studio Enterprise for live unit testing, or Jetbrains Rider, or some Visual Studio Code “hacks”. Here is a method to have coverage of .Net core with a global tool:

Daniel Palme has a global tool version of Report Generator. You should install it once with:

dotnet tool install -g dotnet-reportgenerator-globaltool

dotnet tool install dotnet-reportgenerator-globaltool --tool-path tools

You can then run it with `reportgenerator` so after building I run:

dotnet test --filter FullyQualifiedName~UnitTests /p:CollectCoverage=true /p:CoverletOutputFormat=opencover /p:Exclude="[*Test*]" /p:ExcludeByAttribute="GeneratedCodeAttribute"
reportgenerator "-reports:**\coverage.opencover.xml" "-targetdir:C:\Temp\Reports\" "-reporttypes:HTML"
Start-Process -FilePath "C:\Temp\Reports\index.htm"

Of course you can go to the project properties and add the three lines of powershell to a file in the root of your solution and add to the build events tab as post-build:

Powershell -File "$(SolutionDir)nameOfPowershellscript.ps1"

Good luck!

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Recently the Raspberry Pi 4 was announced, But I am currently using my rpi 3test_1 and want to run Rabbit MQ on it in Docker. So I used these two commands to get it to work and I just wanted to share it:


sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/docker.list;

curl –sL get.docker.com | sed ‘s/9)/10)’ | sh

If you would like to use Docker as a non-root user you should add your user to the docker group:

sudo usermod –aG docker pi

To get Rabbit MQ (which has arm container) on the pi with a management web interface run:

sudo docker run –d –hostname my-rabbit –name some-rabbit –p 15672:15672 –p 5672:5672 rabbitmq:3-management

Then get the ip of the docker container with (but since you added the ports in the previous command, this step can be skipped):

sudo docker inspect –f ‘{{range .NetworkSettings.Networks}}{{.IPAddress}}{{end}}’ some-rabbit

Then you can launch a browser and go to http://thatipaddress:15672 and login with 'guest/guest'. If you did not lookup the ip of the container you can use the ip of the pi because you opened container ports when running it.


8850828555_df7c7bd300_b


Good luck!

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My previous blog post was about my history with mobile phones. How I have switched from Windows Mobile to Android to Windows Phone and back to Android. I have had a temporary car in the beginning of this month. It was a highline Volkswagen Polo which contained the native Volkswagen RS multimedia system. Android Auto worked perfect. Of course I had to download the .apk myself on the phone. But there are plenty of guides explaining that. I was really excited that my new car (Volkswagen Golf) photowould contain a Pioneer system. It was the Pioneer AVIC-EVO1-G72-BBF which has Apple Carplay and Android Auto. I connected my phone with a cable and…. nothing. So I called the Volkswagen dealer and they had to look into it. I got a call back that I would not have that option which seemed weird to me because it was the top most feature on the Pioneer website. After a few days my wife connected her iPhone to charge it and it launched Apple Carplay. I was blown away and took a look at the manuals that I found in the dashboard glovebox. In the installation manual it mentioned on page 8 that you had to connect a USB to a specific port on the back of the Pioneer. So that would explain that Carplay works and Android Auto did not. So I mailed and called the dealer again and they told me to bring the car in.

integration-manual

It took them over three hours to switch the cable on the back and test it. They could not get it to work. They even called Pioneer support and got an answer that it was not supported and would not work. They retrieved a brand new Pioneer system from the warehouse and it was largely displayed on the outside of the box that it would have Android Auto support. So a lot of effort and still no Android Auto. But at least the radio was connected to USB 2. I searched a while online and found this link. I thought it would not affect me because I do not have a Pixel. But I do have USB-C (Nokia 8) and when they delivered the car, there was an USB extension cable in the glovebox so I decided to give it a try. And it finally worked. So buying a short USB-C did not help me, because due to an issue on Pioneers end, I will always need an extension cable Confused smile

Next step: try to update firmware of the adapter and the system itself. Currently I just keep getting incompatible USB stick. Even when it’s formatted as FAT32 filesystem and only has the firmware file on it in the root directory.



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I’d decided to make a good list of my previous owned mobile phones. I have blogged about it before. And made a list of it back in 2013, so it’s time for an update:

  1. Nokia 5110
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/58/Nokia_5110.jpg
  2. Nokia 3210
    Nokia 3210.jpg
  3. Nokia 5210
    https://cf4.s3.souqcdn.com/item/2013/04/28/64/51/46/item_XL_645146_1899588.jpg
  4. Alcatel 511
  5. Motorola T720
    https://www.technopat.net/db/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Motorola-T720-600x600.png
  6. Sony Ericsson W800
    https://i-cdn.phonearena.com/images/phones/4611-large/Sony-Ericsson-W800-0.jpg
  7. HTC S710 (first Windows Mobile phone for me)
    https://image.coolblue.nl/600x315/products/48538
  8. LG Cookie (worst phone ever!)
  9. HTC Touch Diamond 2 (2nd Windows Mobile)
  10. HTC Desire (Android 2.x never got to 4.x)
    /posts/files/image1.jpg
  11. HTC Desire C (Android 4.x never got to 4.1 etc.)
  12. Nokia Lumia 920 (Windows Mobile 7, 7.5 and even Phone 8)
  13. Nokia Lumia 930 (Windows Phone 8)
  14. Microsoft Lumia 950 (Windows 10 Mobile)
  15. Nokia 8 (Android 7 or 8, now running 9)
    http://cdn.eglobalcentral.nl/images/detailed/59/nokia-8-dual-sim-4gb-ram-64gb-blue.jpg

There are rumors about the Nokia 9 which seems awesome, but I've also heard good stories about the Xaomi Mix serie. I will stick to my Nokia 8 for a bit longer.

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I have just enabled the MariaDB 10.x package and installed the famous Heidi SQL from the Microsoft Store (because of the auto update and roaming settings etc.)

So I tried to connect to it. The MariaDB 5.x uses port 3306, but the 10.x uses 3307 (minor detail) However, I could not connect, because by default only localhost connections are enabled.

So I had to SSH into the nas and fix it. But using SSH did not work how it used to. I used Ubuntu (also from the Microsoft store) to `ssh myadminname@localipofnas` but got a cypher not accepted/available message. It turns out that the Synology has disabled several old insecure ciphers. So I had to provide a –c and an algorithm to use in order to get it to work.

“no matching cipher found. Their offer: aes128-cbc,3des-cbc,aes192-cbc,aes256-cbc”

I used `-c aes128-cbc` because it was the first option in the list

Once logged in, I had to launch MariaDB mysql and give the user access within the lan and create a database:

  • Search mysql (/usr/local/mariadb10/bin/mysql)
  • Enter to mariadb with command line: ./mysql -u root –p
    • Use the password
  • Check user's:
    • SELECT User, Host FROM mysql.user WHERE Host <> 'localhost';
  • Granting User Connections From Remote Hosts:
    • GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON . TO 'root'@'192.168.1.%' IDENTIFIED BY 'my-new-password' WITH GRANT OPTION;

Found it on: https://stackoverflow.com/a/51277323/169714

You can also use localhost or % instead of the ip. It depends on what you are trying to do Smile

MariaDB is now ready for some .Net Core

(Only my Synology NAS does not support Docker to run .Net Core…)

I am having doubts if I should try to work around it or just use a Raspberry Pi for my .Net core code.


Good luck, hope it saved someone some time!

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